Category Archives: Appraisal

How Do I Renew My Appraiser License?

The Appraisal Foundation has a national mandate that every licensed appraiser complete one 7 hour National USPAP Update course every 2 years. 

On top of that, every state imposes their own requirements for continuing education (CE) in order to renew your license. 

It is important to check with your state appraisal board to make sure you get everything completed on time, especially if you have a license in multiple states. 

CE Requirements by State

California

California appraisers are required to complete a total of 56 hours of continuing education during the 4-year license cycle.

There are two mandatory deadlines within the 4-year cycle:

Education Renewal Deadline #1: Licensees must complete a 7 hour National USPAP Update course by the second year of their current license.

Education Renewal Deadline #2: Licensees must complete the remaining required 49 hours of continuing education by the end of their 4-year cycle. This must include another 7-hour USPAP course as well as a 4 hour California Laws and Regulations course.

The current renewal fees are:

Trainee
Licensed appraiser
Certified Residential
Certified General

 

$485
$565
$640
$640

Colorado

Appraisers are now required to take 28 hours of approved continuing education every 2 years from the date it was issues. This must include one 7 hour USPAP course.

If you’ve received our initial license on or after July 1st of any year, you do not have to do any CE for that year.

If you received your initial license before July 1st of any year, then you are required to complete 14 hours of CE as a condition of renewal before the license spires on December 31st of the year it was issued.

Florida

State registered, licensed and certified appraisers must complete thirty (30) hours of appraiser continuing education every 24 months as prescribed by the Florida Real Estate Appraisal Board, and shall include the 7-hour National USPAP update course or its equivalent and shall be taught by an AQB certified USPAP instructor. A minimum of 3 hours shall be dedicated to a review and update of the Florida Real Estate Appraisal Law and Board Rules

The 30 required hours can be completed by distance education or classroom

Georgia

 All licensed appraisers in Georgia must complete 14 hours of continuing education every year, and a 7 hour USPAP course every 2 years.

Your education provider will electronically submit your certificates to GREAB on your behalf. You can check the status to see if they have been posted here.Once your CE has successfully posted to your record, you can pay your renewal fee online, up to 120 days prior to your renewal date.

Note: You cannot take the same courses with a one year period.

Illinois

There are three key deadlines to remember:

  1. Licensed Illinois appraisers must complete 28 total hours of continuing education by the CE Completion Deadline, which is on June 30th on odd years (e.g. 2021, 2023, 2025, etc…).
  2. The USPAP course must be completed within 6 months after it comes out.
  3. You must pay the appropriate renewal fee by the License Renewal Deadline, which is on September 30th on odd years.

Note: If you are short on your renewal hours, you will be subjected to a $100 fee per missed CE hour. For example, if you are short 7 hours of CE, the administrative fee is $700.

The current renewal fees are:

Associate Trainee Appraiser
Certified Residential
Certified General

 

$300
$530
$530

Kansas

Although each appraiser renews annually, continuing education runs on a two-year cycle. Renewals during even years ( 2020, 2022, etc.) do not require that you log continuing education. You will simply complete the renewal application and submit it with the renewal fee. Renewals during odd years (2019, 2021, etc.) require that most appraisers log 28 hours of continuing education.

Education cycles are determined by several factors. Generally, the cycle will run from July 1 of each odd year through May 31 of the following odd year. However, if the license was renewed after June 30 of the previous odd year, your education cycle would run from the date that renewal was processed through May 31 of the following odd year [example: If you renewed late on July 15, 2017, then your 2019 education cycle would run from July 15, 2017 through May 31, 2019]. If your Kansas license was originally issued during the current education cycle, the issue date would be the beginning of the cycle. Courses completed prior to Kansas licensure cannot be used to meet any continuing education requirement.

During every two-year education cycle, each appraiser is required to complete the 7-hour USPAP Update course as a part of the hours required.

The current renewal fees are:

Trainee (Provisional)
Licensed appraiser
Certified Residential
Certified General

 

$150
$190
$190
$190

Louisiana

During each two-year certification period and as a prerequisite for certification renewal, state licensed appraisers must complete 28 hours of continuing education course work in courses approved by the Louisiana Real Estate Appraisers Board as follows:

  • The mandatory seven-Hour National Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) Update Course.  (No Exceptions.) 
  • 21 hours in real estate appraisal electives (The certified appraiser may complete these hours in appraisal subject(s) of his/her choice provided the Board approves the course(s).

Credit toward the continuing education requirement for licensed appraiser trainees, certified residential appraisers, and certified general appraisers will not be granted for courses that are less than two instructional hours. A final examination is not required on courses administered for the purpose of continuing education. 

Maryland

Appraisers in Maryland are on a 3 year renewal cycle from the date their license was first issued. 42 total hours of continuing education is required every cycle, including the 7 hour USPAP course which is required every 2 years

The Commission will send out a reminder by mail 30 days prior to your license expiration date.

Anyone who fails to renew his or her license during its regular term may renew the license/certificate if the applicant meets all continuing education and filing requirements and pays the Commission a reinstatement fee of $75 in addition to the renewal fee required. 

The current renewal fees are:

Trainee
Licensed appraiser
Certified Residential
Certified General

 

$150
$250 plus $120 National Registry fee
$250 plus $120 National Registry fee
$250 plus $120 National Registry fee

Michigan

All levels of appraisers must complete 28 hours of continuing education biennially on July 31st.  

Appraisers are required to complete continuing education for a partial year in a continuing education cycle as follows: 

  • For continuing education cycle periods of 185 days or more, 14 hours of continuing education is required.
  • For continuing education cycle periods of less than 185 days, no hours of continuing education are required.
  • Educational offerings taken by an individual in order to fulfill the class hour requirement for a different classification than his/her current classification may be simultaneously counted towards the continuing education requirement of his/her current classification.

The 7-hour National USPAP course must be completed every renewal period. Also, a 2-hour course on Michigan appraiser licensing law and rules must be completed

The renewal notification will be mailed to the home address that is on file with the Department approximately 60 days prior to the date of renewal. 

The current renewal fees are:

Limited Appraiser (Trainee)
State-Licensed Appraiser
Certified Residential
Certified General

 

$250
$350
$350
$350

Ohio

Fourteen (14) hours of continuing education credits must be submitted every year.

The Division must receive a 7‐hour, AQB‐approved National Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) course once every two (2) years as part of the 14‐hour CE requirement

The current renewal fees are:

Registered Appraiser Assistant
Licensed appraiser
Certified Residential
Certified General

 

$50
$125 plus $40 National Registry fee
$125 plus $40 National Registry fee
$125 plus $40 National Registry fee

Oregon

Appraiser Assistants must submit course completion certificate for no less than 14 hours of qualifying or continuing education every year on or before the license expiration date. This must include a 7-hour USPAP update course, which is required every 2 years.

Licensed Appraisers must submit course completion certificates for 28 hours of continuing or qualifying education courses, including a 7-hour USPAP update course, every 2 years on or before the license expiration date. 

The current renewal fees are:

Registered Appraiser Assistant
State-Licensed
Certified Residential
Certified General

 

$75
$500 plus $80 National Registry fee
$500 plus $80 National Registry fee
$500 plus $80 National Registry fee

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania State Board of Certified Real Estate Appraisers requires you to complete 28 total hours of continuing education by June 30th on every odd-numbered year (e.g. 2021, 2023, 2025, etc…)

These must include one 7 hour National USPAP Update course and one 2 hour Pennsylvania Law course.

The board mails renewal notices 2 to 3 months prior to the expiration date.  

The current renewal fees are:

Trainee
Licensed appraiser
Certified Residential
Certified General

 

$150
$305
$305
$305

Texas

Texas appraisers must complete 28 hours of approved Appraiser Continuing Education (ACE) courses every 2 years, including one 7 hour National USPAP Update course.

Note: The same courses cannot be repeated within a 3 year period. 

The current renewal fees are:

Trainee
Licensed appraiser
Certified Residential
Certified General

 

$250
$290
$310
$360

Virginia

All real estate appraisers, including trainees, must satisfactorily complete continuing education courses or seminars offered by accredited colleges, universities, junior and community colleges; adult distributive or marketing education programs; local, state or federal government agencies, boards or commissions; proprietary schools; or real estate appraisal or real estate related organizations of not less than 28 classroom hours during each licensing term.

Seven of the classroom hours completed to satisfy the continuing education requirements shall be the National Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice update course or its equivalent.

Note: Aside from complying with the requirement to complete the 7- Hour National USPAP Update Course, or its equivalent, appraisers may not receive credit for completion of the same continuing education course within a licensing term.

The current renewal fees are:

Trainee
Licensed appraiser
Certified Residential
Certified General

 

$125
$205
$205
$205

Washington

The appraiser license in Washington renews every two years on your birthday. You must complete 28 hours of continuing education during your cycle, including one 7 hour National USPAP Update course.

You can turn in the course certificates 120 days before your license expires.

The current renewal fees are:

Trainee
Licensed appraiser
Certified Residential
Certified General

 

$200
$530
$530
$530

How to Find a Supervisory Appraiser

Finding a supervisor will feel like trying to scale Mount Everest... if you don't know what you're doing.

If you want to become a licensed real estate appraiser, you’ll have to obtain experience as a trainee. This is basically an apprenticeship position under a certified appraiser (Certified Residential or Certified General level). They will be your mentor and teach you the ins and outs of the trade. They are the ones who will show you how to actually write an appraisal report.

Most states require trainees to obtain 1,000 hours of experience in no less than 6 months. California and some other states have the highest requirement at 2,000 hours in no less than a year.

You can work with as many certified appraisers as you want.

Now, to address the elephant in the room. The #1 question (and concern) for anyone trying to get into appraisal is:

“How do I find a certified appraiser to hire me?”

The easiest, and most obvious, way is if you already have a friend or family member who’s a certified appraiser.

Another option is to contact banks or Appraisal Management Companies (AMC) and see if they’re hiring. Some of them even pay you on a salary.

If you’ve exhausted those options, then you’ll have to find one by reaching out to them yourself.

I hear a lot of people complaining that they can’t find anyone. And you know what? I’m not surprised.  The reason why so many people struggle is that they have the wrong expectations and wrong approach.

I personally didn’t know anyone in the industry when I started. I didn’t have any prior connections, and I’ve been able to successfully find multiple supervisory appraisers. They’re definitely out there. In fact, I know some who are actively looking to take on new trainees all the time.

How did I do it?

Set the right expections.

I’ve heard a lot of people say something like “I’ve sent my resume out to 50 appraisers and haven’t heard back.”

What I’m thinking is: why should you expect to hear something back?

I mean, if you were to randomly send your resume out to 50 companies for any other profession, do you really expect them to respond? Or just hire you out of the blue?

You have to put yourself in their shoes. You’re not the first person to ask them for a job.

And since you’re the one looking for the job (not them), you have to first prove that you’re even worth talking to.

It’s also a good idea to know what you’re getting into. This isn’t a get-rich-quick scheme. You’re going to be required to invest a lot of time and energy from the start. This entire process is going to be a marathon, not a sprint. You have to pace yourself. If you set your hopes up too high in the beginning, then you’re only setting yourself up for failure. 

You’re not going to be making very much money as a trainee. This inconvenience is only temporary. Keep your eye on the prize. Remember, you’re building the foundation so you can have a successful 10+ year career.  

The Approach

The #1 way to get hired is by talking to a certified appraiser face-to-face. I cannot stress how valuable meeting someone in person is. They will remember you and get a good feel for the type of person you are.

Here’s my secret on how to contact them in person:

As a trainee, you’re required to take continuing education (CE) courses to keep your appraiser’s license active. Find live courses in your area, and use your CE as an excuse to meet other appraisers. 

Triple Play Appraisal CE Class by Doug Vairo

You can find live CE courses at McKissock, the Appraisal Institute, appraisal coalitions, and at trade associations in your state. 

Don’t take all your CE hours at once. You’ll want to spread your CE schedule over a long period of time, so you have a better chance at meeting more people.

This makes breaking the ice much easier. You can just causally strike up a conversation, and say something like “so how long have you been in the industry?”

Remember, if you introduce yourself, you’re on the “clock.” Your interview has started.

They are sizing you up as a person and as a professional. They are consciously (and sub-consciously) looking at how you dress and present yourself. They will remember you, so make sure you leave a good impression.

Keep in mind, there are good mentors and bad mentors out there, so you want to be vigilant about who you work with. If they come to class with a disheveled appearance and papers spilling out of their binders, probably not a good sign that they’ll make a good supervisor.

If you do find someone that presents themselves professionally and seems knowledgeable, simply ask them if they’re willing to take on any trainees.

If you’re in a remote location or there aren’t very many live classes in your area, then you’ll have to just pick up the phone and call them. Fortunately, you can easily search the National Registry of Appraiser’s to find one in your area. Your state board also provides a directory.

Whether you meet them in person or call them, they will most likely say “no.”

Expect this to happen, but don’t get discouraged. A “no” today isn’t a “no” for tomorrow.

This is where you can separate yourself from people who complain on internet chat rooms that they can’t find anyone.

If you met them in person, ask for their business card. If they didn’t bring one, ask for their phone number and email address.

You're still in the "interview" process.

You must send them a follow up email within 24 hours. Timing is CRUCIAL. This is a small window where you have a chance to prove that you know proper business etiquette.

Keep it casual but professional. Don’t over-analyze the message. Simply tell them it was great to meet them, and that you hope to have an opportunity to work with them in the future.

You are planting a seed in their mind. If you want, you can attach your resume.

Connect with them on LinkedIn. Before you do though, make sure your own LinkedIn profile is polished and up-to-date.

At this point, you’ll need to follow up with them every 1-2 months. Calling them over the phone gives you the best chance of getting hired. If they don’t pick up, then just leave a message.

If you’re an introvert like me and don’t like making phone calls, you can alternate between phone and email.

It doesn’t matter if they respond or not. What’s happening is that they are getting to know you. They get to see your communication and writing skills. They get to see your work ethic and drive. And hopefully, they are even starting to like you.

How long do you have to keep following up? It’s up to you. This is YOUR “interview.” It ends when you quit.

Remember, you only need to find one supervisor. 

Some Last Thoughts

Finding someone to train you doesn’t have to be hard.

Most people struggle because they’re stuck in an “I can’t do it” mindset. Remember that every contact you make with a potential mentor is a “test,” so you should always put your best foot forward. Certified appraisers, and pretty much every company, want to hire people with an “I can” attitude. If something’s not working, then try something else.

That’s not to say that finding a supervisor will be easy. But if you set the right expectations for yourself and be patient with the process, your persistence and hard work will pay off.